Production and Recognition of Governed Prepositions by Female English Major Students at King Faisal University

No Thumbnail Available
Date
2006
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Saudi Digital Library
Abstract
The present study examines the production and recognition of verb-governed, noungoverned, and adjective-governed prepositions by female English major students at two different levels at King Faisal University. The main objectives of the study is to identify the common errors in verb-governed, noun-governed, and adjective-governed prepositions in the performance of the subjects of the study, to explore whether there is a significant difference between the lower and higher groups in the free production, controlled production, and recognition of governed prepositions, to explore whether there is a correlation between the subjects' proficiency level in English and the production and recognition of governed prepositions, and finally, to investigate the major sources of the subjects' errors. The present study suggested five hypotheses to be tested as follows: 1. There is no statistically significant difference (P<.05) in the free production of governed prepositions between English major students in lower and higher groups. 2. There is no statistically significant difference (P<.05) in the controlled production of governed prepositions between English major students in lower and higher groups. 3. There is no statistically significant difference (P<.05) in the recognition of governed prepositions between English major students in lower and higher groups. 4. There is no statistically significant difference (P<.05) in the production and recognition of governed prepositions between English major students in lower and higher groups. 5. There is no statistically significant correlation (r<.05) between the subjects' proficiency level and the production and recognition of governed prepositions by English major students in lower and higher groups. All the five hypotheses were rejected on the basis of the results obtained which showed that there is a significant difference in the free production, controlled production, and recognition of governed prepositions by the lower group and higher group in favor of the higher group. Furthermore, there was a strong relation between the subjects' proficiency level in English and the use of governed prepositions. In other words, the higher the proficiency level the subject had in English, the more likely she would use governed prepositions; the reverse is true. Moreover, the students who had lower proficiency level in English relied heavily on their first language when attempting to use governed prepositions. On the contrary, the higher the proficiency level, the lower the dependence would be on one's first language.
Description
Keywords
Citation
Collections